2006 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates

By

Lee B. Becker, Tudor Vlad, and Joel McLean


Abstract

Graduates of U.S. journalism and mass communication programs confronted a weakened job
market in 2006 and early 2007, as the recovery that began only two years earlier stalled.

Graduates were no more likely to have a job offer when they finished their studies than graduates
a year earlier and no more likely to have landed a full-time job by the end of October–approximately five
months after leaving the university.

Salaries for graduates with full-time jobs did increase and even managed to outpace inflation just
slightly. Benefits, however, showed a marked decline.

As in previous years, nearly all of the 2006 journalism and mass communication bachelor’s
degree recipients who looked for work had at least one in-person job interview (Chart 1). The actual figure
was 93.4%, down slightly but significantly from the 95.9% figure in 2005. Only a very small percentage
(3.1) of graduates reported no interviews at all in 2006. The figure was unchanged from a year ago.

The percentage of journalism and mass communication bachelor’s degree recipients with at least
one job offer on graduation was 76.2 in 2006, a figure statistically comparable to the figure of a year earlier
(Chart 2). The percentage of graduates with at least one job offer dropped sharply after 2000, when
82.4% of the graduates reported leaving the university with at least one job offer. In 2003, the drop
bottomed out, and graduates in 2004 and 2005 each were more likely to leave the university with at least
one job offer than the year before. The improvements seem to have flattened. In 2006, the average
number of job offers on graduation was 1.5, or roughly the same as the year before.

The copyrighted full text of the 2006 Graduate Report is available here.