2004 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates

By

Lee B. Becker, Tudor Vlad, and Amy Jo Coffey


Abstract

The job market for journalism and mass communication graduates showed significant signs of
improvement in 2004 and the first half of 2005. For the first time since 2000, the level of full-time
employment has increased over the year before. Salaries also grew.

The recovery is modest, but numerous indicators are positive. If advertising expenditures continue
to grow as predicted, the outlook for the next several years is quite positive.

Graduates of the nation’s journalism and mass communication programs are generally satisfied
with the jobs they hold, proud of the work they do and committed to the organizations for which they work.

Despite their specialized training and education in journalism, the graduates are more like the
public at large in terms of their criticism of the media. They are not absolutists in terms of media rights,
again, much like the public at large. In general, there is little evidence of change in this regard over the last
decade.

Like the public at large, graduates of the nation’s journalism and mass communication programs
are less likely to use all forms of the media than were graduates ten years ago. They are more likely to
have used the Internet for news “yesterday” than to have read a magazine or a book. They are big
television entertainment viewers, and they listen to radio.

The copyrighted full text of the 2004 Graduate Report is available here.

The PDF version of the charts and tables is available here.

The PDF version of the supplement charts is available here.

Click here to view the table "Salaries by Employer Type."