Annual Enrollment Report Number of Students Studying Journalism and Mass Communication At All-time High

By

Lee B. Becker, Tudor Vlad, Jisu Huh, and Joelle Prine


Abstract

Undergraduate enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs around the country increased dramatically in the autumn of 2000. Total enrollments were up by 12.0%; same unit enrollments were up 8.5%. The number of students enrolled in journalism and mass communication programs was the largest it has ever been.

The undergraduate enrollment growth in journalism and mass communication is mirrored in undergraduate enrollment growth across the university. The projection is for continued growth in undergraduate enrollments nationally, and all indications are that journalism and mass communication enrollments also will continue to increase.

Graduate enrollments in journalism and mass communication also grew in the autumn of 2000 after several years of stagnation, but the growth in graduate enrollments resulted from the opening of new programs rather than growth within existing programs. Total enrollments were up 4.3% for master's programs and 26.1% for doctoral programs, but same unit enrollments declined at the master's level (- 1.4%) and were up at the much smaller doctoral programs by 9.8%.

Graduate enrollments have shown little growth nationally in recent years, reflecting, most likely, the inducements of a strong economy to remain in the labor force.

An estimated 38,311 students earned bachelor's degrees from journalism and mass communication programs in the academic year ending in the summer of 2000, representing an increase of 8.4% from a year earlier. Same unit growth was 7.7%.

An additional 3,300 master's degree recipients earned journalism and mass communication degrees in academic year 1999-2000, up 9.9% from a year earlier. These same programs granted an estimated 217 doctoral degrees, up 19.9% from a year earlier. Same unit change was 1.1% at the master's level and 7.8% at the doctoral level.

The survey also found that only about four in ten of the journalism and mass communication programs report enrollments by race, suggesting many administrators are not closely monitoring these figures. Half report enrollments by gender.

Becker, L. B., Vlad, T., Huh, J., and Prine, J. (2001). Annual Enrollment Report Students Studying Journalism and Mass Communication At All-time High. Journalism and Mass Communication Educator, 56 (3), 28-60.

The copyrighted full text of the 2000 Enrollment Report is available here, courtesy of Journalism & Mass Communication Educator